Sean Spicer at a June 2 press briefing at the White House. In a few short months he became the most famous White House press secretary in history. Was it worth it?
Jabin Botsford, The Washington Post Sean Spicer at a June 2 press briefing at the White House. In a few short months he became the most famous White House press secretary in history. Was it worth it?

So what does happen when you tie your career to Donald Trump?

In the case of Sean Spicer it meant getting everything he ever wanted: a dream job at the press secretary’s podium, name recognition that dwarfed that of many of the politicians he once worked for, and perhaps most importantly, a slice of the Beltway’s most coveted real estate – his own place in the Know.

But wishes come true at a price in the Trump administration. For Spicer, that meant a loss of credibility from inflating inauguration crowd sizes, picking petty fights with the press, and a rabid “Saturday Night Live” parody portrayal that will be remembered long after this administration comes to an end.

Spicer seemed to be able to live with all these humiliations, but losing his spot in the inner sanctum was too much to bear. Spicer resigned Friday after learning that hedge-fund veteran Anthony Scaramucci would be hired as communications director, a move the press secretary had argued against.

“The president wanted to bring on some folks,” Spicer said in an interview with The Washington Post. “[It was] better to give them an opportunity to have a clean slate and evaluate what we’ve done. To figure out what’s working and what needs to be improved upon.”

Spicer was magnanimous on his way out, thanking the president for giving him the “unbelievable honor” of the job he’d always wanted, and noting that he would continue to serve in the position through August for a smooth transition.

But some maintain that serious damage has been done to his reputation.

“He was willing to defend every heinous act and every lie,” said Tim Miller, a former spokesman for Jeb Bush and a one-time Spicer colleague at the Republican National Committee. “But not work with the Mooch. That tells you everything you need to know about Spicer.”

Last July when I…