With Facebook Inc. (FB) and Alphabet Inc.’s Google (GOOG) dominating the online advertising market, newspaper companies are gearing up to band together to seek permission from Congress to collectively negotiate with the internet giants when it comes to how their content is used on the social media sites.

The stakes are high for the publishers including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times (NYT), which are setting aside their rivalries this week to ask Congress to overlook antitrust laws and allow them to create an alliance. With advertising dollars drying up, subscriptions on the decline and smaller newspapers folding, the industry has to find ways to make money and stem the flow of digital ad dollars that go largely to Facebook and Google.

Antitrust laws on the books currently prevent companies from banding together to negotiate, but in this case they are hoping lawmakers will overlook the rules given the dominance of both Google and Facebook in online advertising. It doesn’t hurt that Google was slapped with a $2.7 billion fine from the European Commission last month for antitrust violations. According to Pew Research, Google and Facebook control around 70% of the $73 billion digital advertising market in the U.S. On the flip side newspaper ad revenue…