White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer sidestepped questions Monday over the murder of Timothy Caughman, refusing to acknowledge it as a hate crime and using questions over the heinous slaying to defend people on the “right” he said were blamed too quickly for a recent wave of anti-Semitic threats.

Just hours before James Jackson was charged with murder as an act of terrorism for fatally stabbing Caughman in Midtown, Spicer was asked during his during his daily press briefing Monday to condemn the fatal stabbing and speak about the rise of hate crimes that has beset the nation in recent months.

Instead, Spicer dodged and weaved, claiming that President Trump “wanted to unite the country,” citing the commander-in-chief’s recent sit-down with the Congressional Black Caucus, and stating broadly that “hate crimes and anti-Semitic crimes of any nature should be called out.”

“There is no room for that in our country,” he said.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer holds the daily press briefing on March 27, 2017.
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer holds the daily press briefing on March 27, 2017.

But things quickly went off the rails after Spicer was pressed to speak about Caughman’s murder.

Jackson was charged…