(NEW YORK) — Meetup is taking a leap into the Trump resistance.

The New York-based networking site will unveil plans in the coming days to partner with a labor group — under the guidance of a former Hillary Clinton aide — to coordinate protests among more than 120,000 activists already involved with anti-Trump Meetup groups.

It’s a risky move for a tech company that has helped millions come together to share interests of all kinds, from hiking to languages to President Donald Trump himself. But it reflects an increasing willingness of some major technology firms to push back against the Republican president.

Meetup CEO Scott Heiferman told The Associated Press that the new arrangement, to be known only as #Resist, gives the loosely organized protest movement the infrastructure needed to execute large responses to the new president’s policies.

“It’s one thing for a CEO to say, ‘I’m going to stand up against a politician,'” Heiferman said. “It’s even further for the company itself to mobilize people.”

For Heiferman and other tech leaders, Trump’s push to block immigration from several Muslim-majority countries marked a tipping point.

“When a certain line is crossed,” he said, “we have a civic duty not to be quiet.”

The White House did not respond to a request Friday for comment about Meetup’s plans.

About 40 technology companies met privately this month in New York City to brainstorm ways to push back against Trump policies on immigration, transgender protections, women’s health and arts funding, as well as more traditional technology issues like net neutrality and encryption.

The meeting was designed to “get beyond handwringing and move toward real action,” said Michal Rosenn, general counsel for the Brooklyn-based company Kickstarter.

Kickstarter and Meetup were also among 58 technology companies that signed a friend-of-the-court brief on Tuesday charging that the White House’s revised immigration plan would harm their employees…