When President Trump is ready to let the world know that he is disappointed with the intelligence community, the United States judiciary, individual journalists, department stores or whatever else lands on his radar, he uses Twitter to blast his targets.

It was only a matter of time until his supporters adopted his style.

“I voted for you but you’re still acting like a baby,” one supporter from North Carolina wrote on Sunday, the same day Mr. Trump insulted the billionaire Mark Cuban by saying that he was ‘‘not smart enough to run for president.’’

“When are you going to act Presidential???” wrote another supporter in Arizona that day. “Not every thought needs tweeting.”

“I voted for you but this is embarrassing,” someone else wrote last week, responding to the president’s tweet attacking the department store Nordstrom.

Complaints like these are being logged by a Twitter account called @Trump_Regrets. Since November, the account, managed by Erica Baguma, a 23-year-old Canadian college student, has climbed to more than 220,000 followers by curating some 1,500 messages, mostly from exasperated people who claimed to have voted for Mr. Trump.

It’s easy to dismiss Trump Regrets for what, at first glance, looks like shaky sourcing: It has popped up at a time when several dubious-looking accounts exist just to serve up what a writer for Esquire magazine calls “liberal bait.” Some of the messages are sent from people hiding behind Pepe the Frog avatars, a mascot of alt-right trolls and a designated hate symbol, or faceless egg avatars. Eggs can be especially shifty with their allegiances.

Ms. Baguma, who started the account, said in an interview that she relies on the account’s followers to let her know when a reply is spam. Still, she said it’s difficult to weed out all falsities. With this in mind, The New York Times reached out to a dozen people whose messages were shared by the account, and checked their names against public records, including activity on other social media platforms. Interviews with several of them suggested that their disappointment is real, but that they also would not have voted for Mr. Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton.

And, contrary to the name of the Trump Regrets account, not everyone who has lodged a complaint regrets voting for Mr. Trump.

“You kind of learn that you can’t really generalize a population,” Ms. Baguma said. “I learned that the population is a lot more diverse than I expected.”

Jon A. Krosnick, a professor at Stanford University who studies the psychology of voting, said that he was struck by how many of the Trump Regrets messages seemed to focus on Mr. Trump’s brash leadership style over his policies.

Mr. Krosnick said Mr. Trump’s rushed travel ban was a prime example.

“What’s fascinating about this is people are saying, ‘I elected you to be…