Chances are you’ve heard the term “digital nomad,” as this lifestyle has become more popular — and more visible — in recent years. Digital nomads are people who have taken their work online, using the Internet as a means to continue working while they travel. Their work is truly location independent, allowing them to earn money no matter where they are.

But here’s an intriguing statistic: In the United States, freelancers make up around a third of the workforce, according to a study commissioned by Freelancers Union. And while most have not become digital nomads, many of them certainly could. At the least, telecommuters and freelancers can borrow some of the tricks and strategies digital nomads use for more flexibility, or even to get away for brief working holidays.

If you’ve been wanting to travel more often or for a longer period of time, take a moment to explore the world as seen through the eyes of these six digital nomads. Who knows, maybe one day you’ll join them.

See also: How to Travel Full-Time for $17,000 a Year

1. Matt Kepnes

Founder of NomadicMatt.com, Matt Kepnes started traveling in 2006 after finishing his MBA in the United States. He liked it so much, he decided to continue traveling as a lifestyle. He started a travel blog, and since then has continued running his website from anywhere (and everywhere) in the world.

On Matt’s blog you’ll find plenty of advice for staying on the road for extended periods with his handy tips on saving money and sustaining travel. His motto is “Travel Better. Cheaper. Longer,” after all. He’s also authored several guides for different locations around the globe. His site contains a plethora of resources for those looking to become digital nomads or just wanting to travel for extended periods.

See also: 6 Easy Ways to Get Free Travel

2. Derek “Earl” Baron

Wandering Earl started his journey to becoming a digital nomad way back in 1999, right about the time when this type of work was becoming a real possibility. Now one of the main aims of his website is to “use [his] own experiences to prove that long-term travel does not have to be a crazy fantasy. It can, and should be,…