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Donald Trump speaking to supporters at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, on August 31, 2016.

U.S. efforts to get to the bottom about Russia’s role in hacking this year’s presidential election may very well end up mired in politics, hampering any response.

On Monday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, was the latest U.S. lawmaker to call for an investigation into Russia’s possible involvement. “This simply cannot be a partisan issue,” he said during a press conference.

A growing number of lawmakers, in addition to U.S. intelligence agencies, also assert that Russia was behind the high-profile hacks that were intended to influence this year’s election. Among the targets were Democratic groups and figures whose emails were stolen and later leaked online.

However, any investigation into the matter will probably receive little to no support from incoming President Donald Trump, who’s remained skeptical of the hacking allegations. He’s been particularly dismissive of a new claim from the CIA that the Russian government interfered to help Trump win the election.

“I think it’s ridiculous,” Trump said in an interview aired on Fox News Sunday. “I think it’s just another excuse. I don’t believe it.”

In the interview, Trump went on to allege that rival Democrats are compelling U.S. intelligence groups to claim that Russia meddled in the election. He plans on introducing new leadership to…